9-12 Curriculum Overview


Language Goals


Reading - Children in 9-12 classes will work towards the following according to developmental stages:

Use appropriate decoding and word recognition strategies:


Develop an increasingly extensive vocabulary to construct meaning while reading and enrich writing:


Assimilate information from prior knowledge and experiences to understand various genres:


Develop an understanding of the literary elements used in creating stories:


Respond to text in a variety of ways (speaking, writing, art):


Use a variety of resources (print, audio-visual, technology) to gather and evaluate information to share with others:


Written and Oral Communications Goals

Children in 9-12 classes will work toward the following according to developmental stages:

Written Communication


Research – Use the research process to:


Use available technology to:


Oral Communication


Mathematics goals

Students in a 9-12 classroom will develop their ability to:


Students will develop number sense and explain relationships between numbers. In a 9-12 classroom, students will work towards:


Students will develop an understanding of estimation, measurement, and computation. In a 9-12 classroom, students will work toward:


Students will develop an understanding of basic algebraic concepts. In a 9-12 classroom, students will work towards:


Students will develop spatial sense and understanding of geometry. In a 9-12 classroom, students will work toward:


Students will develop an understanding of patterns. In a 9-12 classroom, students will work towards:


Students will develop a beginning understanding of statistics and probability. In a 9-12 classroom students will work towards:


Cultural Goals

At MWS the ultimate goal is to "empower children to be knowledgeable and responsible contributors to the global community." One of the ways to work to achieve this is through our cultural curriculum. Maria Montessori believed that it is the job of the teacher to guide or direct children into an area of study by stimulating their imagination and interest, and then letting them go on their own as far as they wish using classroom materials and outside resources. If the teacher falls into the temptation of dispensing all of the information so that she is sure the students "get it", two things will happen: 1.) The students will fall into the passive mode of memorize and regurgitate, and 2.) their "studies"will be circumscribed by the limits imposed by the teacher's own research and knowledge of a field, in many instances depriving them of the opportunity to carry their study far beyond the teacher's own knowledge. Both results inhibit the excitement and satisfaction that are part of an authentic Montessori classroom.

As children explore questions in a learning environment where the focus is on an integrated curriculum, the following concepts work to frame their knowledge within academic disciplines such as biology, chemistry, geography and history. The concepts of interdependence, diversity, structure/function, systems and change bring their thinking together from many different perspectives. As children work to construct their knowledge around an essential question, they are challenged to think like an historian, sociologist, chemist, anthropologist, geographer, physicist, biologist, mathematician and artist. These concepts then allow children to take the many ideas from the various disciplines and make connections between them, which helps them make sense of the world around them.

Sound educational practice is a matter of creating a context that not only allows but encourages students to become actively involved in their own learning. We must have confidence in the innate ability of children to learn about the world in which they live. It is a matter of pointing the direction, turning it over to learners and getting out of the way. As a child completes the cultural program, he/she will be able to demonstrate the skills reflected in the MWS Human Potentials:


How does the world work?